Tag Archives: English and ethnic politics

National language debate in Fiji

This article discusses whether Fijian (and also Fiji Hindi), as well as English, should be compulsory languages in school and argues that knowledge of the Fijian language is important for the identity of Fijian people. Wikipedia. Read the article.

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Rwanda opts for English teaching

Officially the Rwandan decision is a result of joining the English-speaking East African Community. But relations between Rwanda and France have been frosty following the 1994 genocide, when France was accused of supporting Hutu militias. Rwanda has applied to join … Continue reading

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Kigali, Rwanda For decades, Rwanda has been one of nearly 30 Francophone countries in Africa where the language of business, power, and civilization has been French. Up until recently, the French-speaking elite here saw their ties to Paris as a … Continue reading

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Rwanda to switch from French to English in schools

The Rwandan government is to switch the country’s entire education system from French to English in one of the most dramatic steps to date in its move away from Francophone influence. Officially the change is to reposition Rwanda as a … Continue reading

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Why East Timor chose Portuguese

This article discusses why the newly independent country of East Timor chose Portuguese as it’s official language, instead of its lingua franca, Tetum, or Indonesian, the language of the region and the one in which a whole generation of East … Continue reading

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Language and Discourse (East Timor)

This article looks at language policy in the new nation of East Timor. It has designated two languages as official languages: Portuguese and Tetum. Two other languages are considered as working languages: Indonesian and English.¬†¬†Read the whole article…

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Cameroon: English speakers dream of “le divorce”

  According to government statistics, English is the first language for 20 percent of Cameroon’s 16.7 million people. These persons form a majority in the present day South-West and North-West Provinces.   “The text of the federal constitution, which was … Continue reading

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